[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Ritzy Rajaswi

How is Cicero's understanding of the Gods in 'De Natura Deorum' different from that of Seneca's idea of God? I am primarily concerned with Cicero.

Answer by Jürgen Lawrenz

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Christopher Li

Hi Professor. I am Catholic. May I know how to prove God as Actus Purus exists? Second, may I know if the argument from act and potency misses out the possibility of degeneration of something? Third, may I know how to prove the existence of substance, as we can merely know the existence of accidents, but we are also inaccurate in such knowledge. Fourth, may I know how can we ensure the existence of motion (changes)? Thank you very much!

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Alex Schwertner

Imagine if Nietzsche were put in charge of the World State, with absolute power to change or eliminate anything about that society. Which elements of the World State do you think he would change and how would he change them, and what would he leave the same? Explain fully and precisely making specific reference to Huxley's Brave New World and to Nietzsche's ideas.

Answer by Jürgen Lawrenz

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Mark Esguerra

St. Augustine and St. Aquinas are two major political thinkers of the Medieval Period. Discuss their social and political philosophies in terms of the following in terms of: Concept of Human Nature and Social and Political Change.

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Ritzi Rajaswi

Do you agree with Aristotle's criticisms, in 'On Generation and Corruption', of Empedocles' account of change?

Answer by Jürgen Lawrenz

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Ritzy Rajaswi

My question is about Empedocles trying to solve the Parmenidean challenge of change and working towards the idea of why does Empedocles have a cosmic cycle. Your guidance would be of utmost importance and greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Answer by Jürgen Lawrenz

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Katherine Bolin

For my senior thesis we are asked to answer a variety of questions, I chose "what is the purpose of human existence?" My thesis is basically: from a secular standpoint there is no true purpose of human existence however, in order for one to feel that their life has purpose the must do the best they can with what they have under the condition that it affects others in a positive way. I know that there is a lot there that I have to define but I need people to destroy my thesis so that I'm ready when the time comes... what's the problems with my statement? Any suggestions on how to make it stronger?

Answer by Peter Jones

Answer by Jürgen Lawrenz

Answer by Geoffrey Klempner

Answer by Hubertus Fremerey 

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from olivia shone

Hello. I see that the natural and constructed world around us offers us meaning. I find myself constructing a grid of meaning that uses abstract nouns e.g. peace, hope, love, excitement, beauty, belonging, freedom, creativity. All things offer up the possibility of 'meaning' which will vary according to the situation, the person and the particularities (social, religious, etc) of that person. Is there a philosopher, or philosophical understanding that can articulate this 'grid of meaning' that I'm speaking of?

Answer by Martin Jenkins

Answer by Jürgen Lawrenz

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Hubertus

What could be the nature of the quest in the cases of the Buddha, of Socrates, of Dante, of Don Quixote, of Dr. Faust? What were they looking for, what insatiable longing was driving them? Does modern philosophy take note of this longing? Does it offer any answers? Do we need a re-enchantment of our world to understand the problem?

Answer by Peter Jones

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from John Kredi

What are the moral implications of hate?

Answer by Geoffrey Klempner

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Jan Siwierski

How does your view of infinity square with Aristotle's account of time and magnitudes as an indefinitely dividable continuum? Isn't finitistic math impossible?

[AAP] Ask a Philosopher - Question from Saleh bader

When Aristotle or Aquinas discuss the unity of substance or the part whole relation (integral parts) they say repeatedly that parts of a substance exist not in themselves but in something else namely the whole substance. What does this exactly mean? And how should I imagine or conceptualize things existing in something else and not in themselves?